December 06, 2016

Overtime Regulations Article Roundup: December 6, 2016

Overtime Regulations Article Roundup: December 6, 2016

By Kit Dickinson on December 06, 2016

young business woman working overtime: looking at glowing screen of her laptop at night

On November 22nd, businesses suddenly suffered a whiplash as a Federal judge ruled the imminent overtime regulations to be illegal. Coming just four business days before the new regulations take effect on December 1st, organizations everywhere are scrambling to understand the implications.

Our monthly roundup features several articles to help you make sense of the current situation and plan a way forward.

Judge Suspends Overtime Rule

Via TLNT. A federal district court judge issued an order Tuesday temporarily stopping new rules on overtime pay from taking effect. Get the details here.

Congress Can Kill Overtime Rule For Good, But Court Might Revive It in The Meantime

Via Forbes. The judge who blocked the Dec. 1 rollout of Obama’s overtime rule included conflicting statements in his ruling, which the government might exploit to gain the rule a reprieve. So will the judge’s order stick or not?

Overtime Rule Delay Gives Opportunity to Fix Scheduling Practices

Via SHRM. Whether the December 1 overtime rule takes effect or not, employers now have the opportunity to address the underlying problem: Why are employees working overtime to begin with?

If They’re Revived: 9 Remarkable Overtime Rule Tips from DOL Insider

Via HR Morning. The overtime law may be in limbo, but it’s best to be prepared for its implementation. Here’s a DOL insider’s advice to employers.

OT Rules: The Impact on Workplace Culture, Productivity

Via Central Penn Business Journal. If the overtime rule goes into effect, how will it impact your company’s culture and productivity? Here are some effects to be ready for.

Unpaid Work Time Is Not Offset By Voluntary Payment

Via HRUSA. Employers should exercise great caution in considering any voluntary payments as an offset for the wages required by federal or state law.

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