August 30, 2016

HR Article Roundup: August 30, 2016

HR Article Roundup: August 30, 2016

By Kit Dickinson on August 30, 2016

Two businesswomen discussing their ideas at break

The Department of Labor was sued for not properly paying overtime to thousands of workers, Millennial workers could get resentful over the coming overtime regulations, and Patriot Software offers tips for cutting your payroll processing time.

These are a few of the top HR articles we’ve assembled from the last month that address various changes in the HR and payroll landscape. Take a look at the latest HR news.

DOL Agrees to Pay $7M to Settle Claim it didn’t pay OT to thousands of Workers

Via HR Morning. The Department of Labor, the Federal body that establishes and regulates overtime requirements, has just settled a $7 million claim that it was non-compliant with its own overtime rules. Thousands of employees were affected.

[Infographic] How to Save Time Processing Payroll

Via Patriot Software. Payroll processing can take a lot of your time away from your core business—especially if you have unique pay policies to factor in. Patriot Software provides a helpful infographic that shows how you can reduce your payroll processing time.

Hand with stopwatch. Overlay text says "5 ways to save time processing payroll."

Workers Need More Wage and Hour Training

Via SHRM. Despite the new overtime rule change on Dec. 1, wage and hour training came in dead last in a recent survey of planned employment law training topics. Workplace harassment was the top training topic. Get the details here.

Special Handling May Be Required For Your Younger Workers Affected By The OT Rules

Via TLNT. The new overtime law may ruffle the feathers of young employees and create some dissention at work. Autonomy in the workplace is highly valued by Millennials and the new regulations run counter to their goals at work. Here’s what to expect and how to ease the transition.

A Wage and Hour Primer for Employers With Tipped Employees

Via Workforce. A waitress is suing Walt Disney World for improperly taking a “tip credit” and paying her less than the minimum wage even though she spent significant time performing non-tipped work. What is a tip credit and how does it affect you?

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